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Neighbor says he complained about faulty stove before deadly fire

GREENSBORO, NC — Capt. Davis said that the police department is currently assisting the fire department in its investigation. Davis said he wouldn’t rule out a criminal investigation in the future, but at this point the evidence doesn’t warrant it. “There’s a lot of emotion around this,” he said. “It’s extremely delicate. Any death is bad, but you’ve got five kids. Several levels of grief come into play. You have a group of people that came to this country for a better life, and they’re in conditions that are not comfortable. I want to be here so people know the police department’s investigative body is in the game.”

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Lawsuit filed over worker’s electrocution at Agapion-owned apartments

GREENSBORO, NC — The lawsuit was filed by Gary Hickenbottom’s widow, Carissa Hickenbottom, who lives in Ohio. The suit names family patriarch Basil “Bill” Agapion, various family members and ownership entities, along with the city of Greensboro as defendants. Carissa Hickenbottom is seeking at least $25,000 plus interest to cover damages, including “funeral expenses, pain and suffering, loss of service, protection, care, assistance, society, companionship, comfort, guidance, kindly offices and advice, among other things.” The suit asserts claims of negligence against both the Agapion family and the city, and a claim of wrongful death against the Agapions.

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Jim Crow returns to North Carolina public education

The Republican-controlled General Assembly has given new wings to white flight. As if North Carolina hadn’t regressed far enough in resegregation, lawmakers passed a bill last week that empowers four municipalities in Mecklenburg County to establish their own charter schools. Specifically, House Bill 514 allows the Charlotte suburbs of Cornelius, Huntersville, Matthews and Mint Hill to create charter schools and to give preference for enrollment to their own residents. A companion bill allows them to fund the schools with property taxes. All of these communities are affluent and predominantly white.

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Citizen Green: Greensboro stalls for time on panhandling lawsuit

The drip-drip-drip torture of delayed decision-making in local governance usually works to the advantage of government and business interests over the poor. Elected officials are going to show up regardless; business interests are sufficiently organized and command the resources to play the long game of advocacy. The poor have to make a proportionately higher sacrifice to organize themselves and get in front of their elected officials to make their case. But in the case of Greensboro’s suspended aggressive solicitation ordinance, the waiting game can also be seen as a function of city council’s recognition that they’re about to walk into a legal fight they can’t win. Or, if you believe Marcus Hyde, the manager of the Homeless Union of Greensboro, there’s a more sinister plan afoot.

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News Release: City Council Officially Selects David Parrish as City Manager

GREENSBORO, NC — During its Tuesday, June 5 meeting, Greensboro City Council selected Interim City manager David Parrish as City Manager, effective immediately. Parrish has served in the interim role since March 20 after former City Manager Jim Westmoreland announced his retirement. Prior to serving as the interim city manager, Parrish was an assistant city manager since November 2012. He came to the City of Greensboro after serving as deputy city manager for the City of Danville, VA. With Greensboro, Parrish has overseen the City’s field operations, engineering and inspections, planning, Guilford Metro 911, water resources, transportation, and fire departments.

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